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APS support for Australians

This infographic presents various statistics on the support the APS provided Australians in the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic. This page has 6 separate images. The first image outlines the number of phone calls (3.7 million) that Services Australia monitored in a 55 day period.

The second image displays the number of social media interactions (250,000) that Services Australia monitored over the same 55 day period.

The third image provides data on the JobKeeper payments received by Australians. By mid-July 2020, 960,000 organisations and 3.5 million individuals had received $30.6 billion in JobKeeper payments.

The fourth image displays the number of service centre walk-ins (1.9 million) that Services Australia monitored over a 55 day period.

The fifth image provides data on the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s efforts to assist Australians in returning to Australia from overseas. DFAT received more than 40,600 phone calls to its consular service and assisted more than 28,000 Australians return home.

The sixth image outlines the number of logins to the myGov website on 25 March 2020. On this day, my.gov.au received 2.6 million logins, a 44% increase on the previous record of 1.8 million daily logins.

Figure 1.4: Proportion of APS employees who feel their agency inspires them to come up with new or better ways of doing things

Figure 1.4 is a column graph that compares the 2019 APS employee census results (from 12 APS agencies), to 2020 internal APS agency employee surveys (from those same 12 APS agencies), on the question: ‘My agency inspires me to come up with new or better ways of doing things’. In the 2019 APS employee census, 48% of employees across 12 agencies agreed that their agency inspires them to come up with new or better ways of doing things. This increased to 65% in agency surveys undertaken in 2020

Figure 1.5: What were the positives of the temporary mobility opportunity?

Figure 1.5 is a bar graph that displays the positives of the temporary mobility opportunity identified by surge workforce survey respondents. The positives that were identified were: the opportunity to help serve Australian citizens (84%), try different work (70%), broaden professional networks (65%), learn new skills (61%), engage with the public (40%), work in a different location (29%), other (18%) and less travel time or reduced costs associated with the commute to work (15%).

Figure 1.6: Challenges for agencies in identifying the capability and roles of employees for deployment for the COVID-19 surge response

Figure 1.6 is a bar graph that shows the challenges for agencies in identifying the capability and roles of employees for deployment for the COVID-19 surge response. 44% of agencies identified no challenges in identifying the capability and roles of employees who could be redeployed for the COVID-19 surge response. The most common challenges were meeting own agencies critical/essential functions (23%) and data about skills and job roles (17%). Other challenges that were identified by less than 10% of agencies were: employee availability or willingness, lack of clear/consistent advice and geographical barriers.

Figure 1.7: Percentage of employees taking annual leave, DESE (2018 to 2020)

Figure 1.7 is a line graph that compares the percentage of Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) employees taking annual leave over a 12 month period (January to December) in 2018, 2019 and 2020. The graph shows that annual leave taken in 2018 and 2019 followed similar trends, peaking in January (65% in 2018, 66% in 2019), April (48% in 2018, 58% in 2019), July, October and December. Annual leave taken in 2020 also peaked in January at 69%, however dropped dramatically in February (32%), and continued to drop through March (28%) and April (22%) towards a low of 20% in May. After May, annual leave taken in 2020 continued to remain at levels well below that of 2018 and 2019.

Figure 1.8: Percentage of employees taking personal leave, DESE (2018 to 2020)

Figure 1.8 is a line graph that compares the percentage of DESE employees taking personal leave over a 12 month period (January to December) in 2018, 2019 and 2020. The graph shows that personal leave taken in 2018 and 2019 followed similar trends, with lows in April (43% in both years) and December. After February, personal leave taken in 2020 dropped towards a low of 25% in April. After April, personal leave taken in 2020 did increase but continued to remain at levels well below that of 2018 and 2019.

Figure 1.9: Flex balances - hours per person at end of month, DESE (January to September 2020)

Figure 1.9 is a column graph that shows the flex balances of DESE employees between January and September 2020. Flex balances increased from 5.4 hours per person in January and February, to a peak of 9.2 hours per person in June.

Workplace availability

This infographic presents data about workplace availability in the Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE). This infographic has 3 separate parts. The first part is titled ‘Leave effects’. Pre-COVID, 2019 figures on employee planned and unplanned leave showed that out of 20 working days, employees had 1.5 days of planned leave and 1 day of unplanned leave per employee. This equated to an availability of 87.5% (17.5 days). During COVID in April 2020, figures showed that employees had 0.5 days of planned leave and 0.5 days of unplanned leave per employee. This equated to an availability of 95% (19 days). From these figures, ‘workplace availability’ had changed: there was approximately 7.5% growth in labour via reduced leave. The second part is titled ‘Flex balance effects’. Flex grew by around 2 hours per critical employee during April 2020. As a percentage of normal full-time monthly working hours (2 hours divided by 150 hours), this equated to approximately 1.3% growth in labour via increased flex. The third part is titled ‘Total effects’. There was approximately a 9% increase in ‘workplace availability’, or total hours worked, in April 2020 to support Australia as part of the COVID-19 response.

Figure 1.10: Employee perceptions of mental health changes at one APS agency

Figure 1.10 is a stacked bar graph that displays employee perceptions of how their mental health changed in comparison to pre-COVID-19. In one large agency, 21% of respondents indicated that their mental health has improved. 41% indicated their mental health was not impacted, and 35% indicated that it had declined.

Figure 1.11: Internal communication (12 agencies)

Figure 1.11 is a column graph that compares employee responses in the 2019 APS employee census results (from 12 APS agencies), to 2020 internal APS agency employee surveys (from those same 12 APS agencies) on the effectiveness of internal communication within their agencies. In the 2019 APS employee census, 53% of employees across 12 agencies agreed that internal communication within their agency was effective. This increased to 72% in agency surveys undertaken in 2020.

Figure 2.1: Number of APS employees investigated for a suspected breach of the APS Code of Conduct (2014 to 2020)

Figure 2.1 is a line graph that shows the number of APS employees investigated for a suspected breach of the APS Code of Conduct between 2014 and 2020. The number has remained relatively stable with a low of 535 in 2019 and a high of 717 in 2016. In 2020, there were 656 employees investigated.

Social Media

A still frame of a video showing a speech bubble overlaid with a ‘thumbs up’ icon. The speech bubble’s text reads ‘Personal behaviour on social media guidance’. To the right of this is a drawing of a mobile phone open on a social media page, a mug of coffee next to a croissant, and a second speech bubble with blocks representing text. Overlaying the still frame is a headshot of a man in a suit and tie.’

Figure 2.3: Strategies employed by APS agencies to support and extend high performers

Figure 2.3 is a bar graph that displays the strategies employed by APS agencies to support and extend high performers in 2020. The graph shows that 97% of agencies had strategies in place to support and extend high performance. The 3 most popular strategies were opportunities for: learning and development (91%); work on high profile/high priority projects (89%); professional growth (89%).

Figure 2.4: Proportion of employees by job family that have moved agencies (2019-20)

Figure 2.4 is a bar graph that shows the proportion of employees by job family that have moved agencies in financial year 2019-20. Employees in the strategic policy job family have had the largest number of movements, with just under 8%. The next closest are legal and parliamentary, organisational leadership and communications and marketing, which were all between 5 and 6%. Engineering and technical, health, science, and trades and labour had less than 1% of employees move between agencies.

Figure 3.1: APS employee headcount over time, ongoing/non-ongoing/total (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.1 is a line graph that shows the APS employee headcount over time for ongoing, non-ongoing and all APS employees. The total number of APS employees increased steadily from 2001, where it started at around 120,000 employees to 2012 where it peaked at about 167,000 employees. It then dropped over the next few years, to a low of 146,000 in 2019. It has increased to 150,000 in 2020. The ongoing trend closely mirrors that of the total. Most employees are ongoing, with over 130,000 ongoing employees in 2020. The number of ongoing employees has slowly been going up, peaking at just under 20,000 this year.

Figure 3.2: Changing proportion of employees by classification (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.2 consists of two line graphs that show how the proportions of classifications have changed from 2001 to 2020. SES has increased from 1.4% to 1.8%, the Trainee and Graduate trend line has increased from just over 1% to 1.3%. APS 3 and 4 has decreased from 39% to 29%, APS 5 and 6 has increased from 29% to 37%. EL 1 and 2 has increased from 18% to 26% and the APS 1 and 2 trend line has decreased from 10% to 4%.

Figure 3.3: APS employee numbers by location (30 June 2020)

Figure 3.3 displays a map of Australia representing the location of the APS workforce by state or territory as at 30 June 2020: the ACT had 56,654 employees which equated to 37.7% of the APS workforce; NSW had 26,724 employees (17.8%); VIC had 25,890 (17.2%); QLD had 17,804 employees (11.8%); SA had 9,592 employees (6.4%); WA had 6,951 employees (4.6%); TAS had 3,738 employees (2.5%); the NT had 1,891 employees (1.3%).

Figure 3.4: Proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, employees with disability, and employees from a Non-English Speaking Background in the APS (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.4 is a line graph that shows the proportion of Indigenous employees, people with disability, and people from a non-English speaking background in the APS from 2001 to 2020. The proportion of people from a non-English speaking background increased from around 11% to around 15% from 2001 to 2019, and has dropped for the first time to just over 14% in 2020. The proportion of Indigenous employees was reasonably constant at just under 3% for the first 12 years, and has risen steadily since 2012, peaking at 3.6% in 2019. The proportion of people with disability started at just over 4%, then dropped to under 4% in 2006, where it stayed until 2020, when it reached 4% again

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees—at a glance. 

This infographic presents key diversity proportion statistics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander APS employees. This page has four separate images. The first image shows that women account for 67.4% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander APS employees. The second image shows that Generation Y employees (aged between 25-34 years) account for the largest proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees at 30.0%. The third image shows that 36.0% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander APS employees work in regional areas, compared to 13.6% of non-Indigenous APS employees. The fourth image outlines the three most common roles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees. 43.6% (1,796) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees work in service delivery, of this number, 1,234 work in call centre roles. 9.9% work in compliance and regulation and 9.3% work in administrative roles.

Figure 3.7: Proportion of Indigenous and non-Indigenous employment by APS classification (30 June 2001)

Figure 3.7 is a column graph that shows the proportion of Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees by classification as at 30 June 2001. The graph shows that compared to non-Indigenous employees, the majority of Indigenous employees (70%), are at the APS 4 level or lower. 48% of non-Indigenous employees are at the APS 4 level or lower. Indigenous employees are particularly more represented at the APS 4, APS 1, and trainee classifications when compared to the non-Indigenous cohort.

Figure 3.8: Proportion of Indigenous and non-Indigenous employment by APS classification (30 June 2020)

Figure 3.8 is a column graph that shows the proportion of Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees by classification as at 30 June 2020. Indigenous employees are most represented at the APS 4 level at 30%, whereas non-Indigenous employees are most represented at the APS 6 level with 23%. Compared to Figure 3.7 both non-Indigenous employees and Indigenous employees have a higher proportion of employees at the APS 6, EL 1 and EL 2 levels. However, the increase for non-Indigenous employees at these levels is more pronounced. At the EL 1 level there has been an increase of 6% to 19.3% for non-Indigenous employees from 2001 to 2020 compared to an increase of about 4% to 7.4% for Indigenous employees.

Figure 3.9: Net engagement, Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.9 shows a line graph which is the net engagement rate (engagement rate minus separation rate) of Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees. During the 2000's the net engagement rate was mainly between 0% and 6% for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees. After 2010 the net engagement rate for Indigenous employees peaked in 2016 at 8% and dropped below 0% in 2020. For non-Indigenous employees the net engagement rate dropped to a low of -6% in 2015 before climbing back up to 0.5% in 2020.

Figure 3.10: Median length of service at separation, Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees (2000-01 to 2019‑20)

Figure 3.10 is a line graph that shows the median length of service at separation for Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees between 2000-01 and 2019-20. The median length of service for non-Indigenous employees has always been much higher, ranging between just under 6 years in 2007 and over 12 years in 2019. The median length of service at separation for Indigenous employees has always been between 2 and 6 years. The gap has been widening over the past few years and in 2019-20, the median length of service for Indigenous employees was just under 4 years, and was 12 years for non-Indigenous employees.

Figure 3.11: Proportion of women and men in the APS (ongoing), compared to Australian workforce participation rate (1968 to 2020)

Figure 3.11 is a line graph that shows the proportion of ongoing employees by gender from 1968 to 2020. In 1968, over 75% of employees were men. This proportion has trended downwards consistently over the past 50 years. In 2000, women outnumbered men for the first time. In 2020, just under 60% of ongoing employees are women.

Figure 3.12: Proportion of women promoted into and within the SES (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.12 is a line graph that shows the proportion of women promoted into and within the SES. There are 4 lines which represent: All SES, SES 1, SES 2 and SES 3. The promotion of women in All SES has been gradually increasing from 31% in 2001 to 60% in 2020, with SES 1, SES 2 and SES 3 following a similar trend.

Figure 3.13: Proportion of women in leadership roles (EL 1 - SES 3) (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.13 is a line graph that shows the proportion of women in leadership roles for EL 1 to SES Band 3 classifications from 2001 to 2020. All have trended upwards over the past 20 years. EL 1 started at just under 40% women and in 2020 is at around 54%. SES Band 3 started at 15% and is now at 45%. SES Band 1 and EL 2 proportions have been very similar over the 20 years, and are now just under 50%. In 2016, SES 3 overtook SES 2 in terms of proportion of women. The numbers for each now range from 42% for SES 2 to 54% for EL 1.

Figure 3.14: Proportion of job family by gender (30 June 2020)

Figure 3.14 is a vertical bar graph that shows the proportion of men and women in each job family as at 30 June 2020. It can be observed that many job families have an uneven representation. Three job families with the highest representation of women include health (80%), service delivery (72.8%), and human resources (71.5%). The 3 job families with the highest representation of men include engineering and technical (82.8%), trades and labour (72.9%), and science (70.7%).

Figure 3.15: Average APS gender pay gap trends, compared to national average (2015 to 2019)

Figure 3.15 is a line graph that shows the average National and APS gender pay gap from 2015 to 2019. The national gender pay gap is higher than the APS gender pay gap from 2015 to 2019. It was 17.2% in 2015 and slowly shrunk to 13.9% in 2019. The APS gender pay gap was 9.1% in 2015 and has shrunk to 7.3% in 2019.

Figure 3.17: Classification by disability status (30 June 2020)

Figure 3.17 is a bar chart that shows the proportion of employees with disability and employees without disability by APS classification. The proportion of employees is similar in most classifications except for APS 3-4 and EL. There are around 10% more employees with disability at the APS 3-4 level compared to those without disability. On the other hand, there are around 12% more employees without disability at the EL levels compared to employees with disability.

Figure 3.18: Retention rate of employees with and without disability (2001-02 to 2019-20)

Figure 3.18 is a line graph that shows the retention rate of employees by disability status. While the retention rates of those with disability and without disability have a similar trend, the retention rate of those with disability is usually around 1% to 1.5% lower than those without disability. For both groups, they were around 92% to 95% until 2016 where those with disability saw a drop in their retention rate to a low of 89% in 2018-19, and then back up to 92% in 2019-20. For those without disability the retention rate stayed between 92% and 95%, and was 94% in 2019-20.

Figure 3.19: Proportion of culturally and linguistically diverse employees, APS and Australia (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.19 is a line graph of the proportion of those born overseas in the APS and Australia from 2001 to 2020. There are two additional lines that show the proportion of those born in a CALD country, which is any country not defined as a Main English Speaking Country by the ABS. The proportion of Australians born overseas has increased from around 23% in 2001 to 30% in 2018, and the proportion of Australians born in a CALD country of birth has increased from around 14% in 2001 to 22% in 2018. The proportion of APS employees born overseas has increased from around 20% in 2001 to 23% in 2018, and the proportion of APS employees born in a CALD country of birth has increased from around 12% in 2001 to 16% in 2018.

Figure 3.20: Region of birth for APS employees born overseas (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.20 is a line graph that shows the proportion of APS employees born overseas by region of birth from 2001 to 2020. Changes in the proportion from 2001 to 2020 are as follows: The proportion of those born in Europe has dropped from 47% to 29%, those born in Asia has increased from 32% to 46%, those born in Oceania and Antarctica has remained consistent at 9%, those from African and the Middle East has increased from 7% to 9%, and those born in the Americas has increased from 6% to 7%.

Figure 3.21: Age distribution comparison between APS and Australian workforce (30 June 2020)

Figure 3.21 is a bar graph that shows the age distribution comparison between the APS and the Australian Workforce as at 30 June 2020. The proportion of the APS workforce is lower than the Australian workforce for the age groups 15-19, 20-24 and 25-34. 24.6% of the APS workforce is between the ages 15 to 34 as opposed to 37.5% Australian workforce in the same age group. The proportion of the APS workforce in the age group 35-44 is 27.9%, and in the age group 45-54 it is 28.0%, which is 5.6% and 7.3% higher respectively compared to the  same age groups for the Australian workforce. For ages above or equal to 55, the proportion of both the APS workforce and the Australian workforce is around 19.5%.

Figure 3.22: APS average retirement age by gender (2001 to 2020)

Figure 3.22 is a line graph that shows the APS Average Retirement Age by Gender from financial year 2001 to 2020. The APS Average Retirement Age increased for men from 59.3 in 2001 to 61.8 in 2020, and for women from 58.9 in 2001 to 61.3 in 2020. The APS Average Retirement Age for men is consistently higher than that of women from 2001 to 2020

Figure A4.6: Job families, by location (30 June 2020)

Figure A4.6 shows job families by location. The job family with the highest proportion in the ACT is strategic policy, where just under 90% of employees work in the ACT. Compliance and regulation has the highest proportion of employees working in other cities, with just under 80%. The health and service delivery job families have the largest proportion of regional roles, with around 30% of employees in regional locations.

Last reviewed: 
1 December 2020