APS Employment Data 31 December 2018 release: Introduction

APS Employment Data 31 December 2018 release: Introduction

This release of APS employment data presents a statistical overview of the APS workforce employed under the Public Service Act 1999 (the PS Act). It provides a broad overview of key workforce metrics as at 31 December 2018 and trends from 2000, with relevant data tables referenced throughout. 

This data release is a companion to the Australian Public Service Commissioner’s annual State of the Service Report (SOSR) that was tabled in November 2018. This report draws on a range of information sources, including annual APS agency and employee surveys to provide a detailed picture of the state of the APS.

This current APS employment data release covers 98 agencies. Any agencies without APS staff at 31 December 2018 are excluded from reporting.

The Australian Public Service Employment Database (APSED)

On 30 June and 31 December each year a ‘snapshot’ covering all APS employees is released by the APSC based on data provided by agencies.

APS employment data includes:

  • Demographic variables including age, gender and work location
  • Classification (level) of APS positions, from trainee to SES level
  • Diversity data including voluntary items self-reported by APS staff such as disability status, Indigenous status, and Non-English Speaking Background
  • Staff movements including engagements, separations and transfers between agencies.

The reported size of the APS workforce is a count of all people employed at the time of the ‘snapshot’. This figure does not adjust for hours worked and it includes any employees who are on extended leave (for 3 months or more), including those on maternity leave and leave without pay.

This figure is different to Average Staffing Level (ASL) data provided in the Federal Budget papers. The ASL counts active staff for the time they work. This figure calculates staffing by allocating individual working hours based on the proportion of full time hours worked. For example, a full time employee is counted as 1 employee, while a part time employee who works three full days per week contributes 0.6. The ASL averages staffing over an annual period. It is not a point in time test.

The Government places a cap on ASL. This is applied across the General Government Sector (which incorporates all of the APS and a range of other government agencies). ASL caps are published in the Federal Budget Papers each year (for 2018–19 and 2019-20 ASL estimates, see Federal Budget Paper Number 4, 2018).

Another measure of employee numbers used by both private and public sector organisations is Full Time Equivalent (FTE). This is a count of all active staff at a point in time.

For further details on APSED, including its scope, see APSC’s APSED page.

Interactive data—APSEDii

APSEDii will be unavailable for the next few months.

The APSC is currently transitioning to a new ICT environment. As part of this process APSEDii is being transferred to a new platform.

It is our intention that APSEDii will return at the end of November to coincide with the release of the 2018-19 State of the Service Report.

If you would like to access APS workforce data not covered by our data tables, please contact us at APSED [at] apsc.gov.au

Feedback

The APSC is committed to providing readers with the information they require in the most useful format, and feedback is welcome. Please e-mail apsed [at] apsc.gov.au ( )if you would like to provide any comments.

AttachmentSize
APS Employment Data - 31 December 2018 release (PDF 2MB)2.03 MB
APS Employment Data - 31 December 2018 release - Data tables (Excel 3.29MB)0 bytes
Page type: 
Campaign page

At a Glance

At a Glance

Diversity

Diversity

The APS employment database (APSED) records diversity information in relation to gender, Indigenous status, disability status and employees from a non-English speaking background.

The APS employee census, which is an anonymous survey, tracks similar diversity information as the APSED, as well as LGBTI+ status.

APS employment data suggests that the APS continues to improve its employee diversity.

At December 2018, 5,135 (3.5%) of the APS identified as Indigenous. This is the highest proportion of Indigenous employees ever recorded for the APS. Indigenous representation has been increasing steadily from 2.6% in 2013.

The proportion of employees with a disability was 3.7% at 31 December 2018. This figure marginally increased from a low of 3.2% in 2012 to 3.7% in 2015, where it has remained.

Non-English speaking background (NESB) is split into two components: NESB 1 refers to people born overseas who arrived in Australia after the age of five and whose first language was not English; NESB 2 refers to children of migrants.The combined proportion of employees from non-English speaking backgrounds (i.e. NESB 1 & NESB 2) has increased from 13.1% in December 2008 to 14.3% in December 2018.  At December 2018, 22% of the APS were born overseas compared to 26% for the Australian population as a whole (ABS 2016 Census: Multicultural, 2017). 

Figure 5: Diversity proportion of employees at 31 December 2008, 2013 and 2018

Source:  APSED December 2018 Table 69

It is not mandatory for employees to provide diversity information.  This means that diversity rates may be underestimated in some cases. The reporting of disability rates based on APS employee census data was explored in more detail in the annual State of the Service Report. Of the census respondents in 2018, 8.7 per cent of employees reported having an ongoing disability.

The overall proportion of women in the APS was 59.5% at 31 December 2018. This is a 0.5% increase since June 2018. 

The proportion of women at each classification is either equal to or more than men at all levels, up to and including EL1. The proportion of women is twice as much as men at the APS 4 classification.

There was a lower proportion of women at the senior levels (EL 2 and SES) than men at 31 December 2018. Numbers of women at the EL 2 level continue to increase, now representing 46.8% of employees at that level, up from 28.2% in 2000. Over the same period, the proportion of female SES has increased substantially to 45.6% in 2018 from 25.9% in 2000.  During 2018, 55.5% of employees joining the SES were women.  Additionally, separations of women at SES level (39.5%) were lower than men. This may help to balance the number of women and men at the senior executive level over the next few years, (APSED December 2018 Tables 11 and 43).

Figure 6: Proportion of APS employees by classification and gender, 31 December 2018

Source:  APSED December 2018 Table 9

Job Families

Job Families

There are many diverse roles performed within the APS. The APSC has developed a ‘Job Family Model’ which groups functionally similar positions that have related skills, tasks and knowledge.

As at 31 December 2018, 27 APS entities supplied Job Family data relating to 111,185 (75.6%) of APS employees.

More than a quarter of APS employees work in Service Delivery (29.3%). Other job categories that employ noteworthy numbers of APS staff are Compliance and Regulation (13.9%), Administration (8.1%) and ICT (6.1%), (APSED December 2018 Table 28).

Job Roles

Each Job Family can be further broken down into functional clusters, which are made up of individual Job Roles. Of the data available at 31 December 2018, there were 369 distinctive Job Roles in the APS. One sixth (16.6%) of APS employees work in call or contact centres. Agencies that employ a large number of people in this role are Department of Human Services, Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, Department of Veterans’ Affairs and Department of Home Affairs. Other common roles include Compliance Case Management, Administrative Support, Customer Support and Programme Advice and Support.

Gender

Many job families have an uneven gender representation. Areas such as Health (80.1%), Service Delivery (73.7%), Human Resources (68.8%) and Communications and Marketing (68.5%) employ proportionally more females. In contrast, males tend to work more in technical job families such as Engineering and Technical (84.7%), Science (71.1%), Trades and Labour (72.9%) and ICT (66.2%). 

Figure 8: Job Family by Gender, 31 December 2018

Source:  APSED December 2018 Table 28

Movement between agencies

Of the 111,185 employees with Job Family details in the APSED database; 2,098 ongoing APS employees have moved agencies during 2018. It was noted that more technical specialist job family roles tend to have lower mobility than generalist job family roles. The Strategic Policy (6.56%) Job Family had the highest proportion followed by Organisational Leadership (5.4%). The Job familes with the lowest mobility of less than 1% are Trade and Labour, Science, Engineering and Technical, and Health. It must be noted that not all employees would have moved to the same job family in their new agency.

Figure 9: Proportion of employees in each Job family that have moved agencies

Source: APSED December 2018 Table 28

Movement of Employees

Movement of Employees

Each year large numbers of employees move into and within the APS. These movements can be tracked using the APS Employment Database (APSED).

During 2018, there were 23,028 movements consisting of:

  • 8,632 people engaged as ongoing employees.
  • 10,121 current employees promoted within their agencies to ongoing positions.
  • 1,069 current employees promoted to another APS agency.
  • 2,463 employees transferred permanently to another APS agency.
  • 743 employees temporarily transferred to another APS agency.

This equates to 17.4% of the APS changing roles in the year to 31 December 2018. The true mobility of the APS is however higher. APSED data does not include movements (at-level) within agencies, or secondments among agencies. 

Engagements of new ongoing employees in the APS fell by 6.4% (8,632 new employees) compared to the year to December 2017 engagements (9,222 employees). Since 2001, trends in engagements have fluctuated from 2,702 during the recruitment freeze in 2014 to a peak of 19,446 during 2007, (APSED December 2018 Table 43).

Most engagements in 2018 were at the APS 4 level (19.5%), APS 6 level (17.1%), and at APS 5 and APS 3 levels (14.8% each), (APSED December 2018 Table 43).

Overall, 41.8% of ongoing engagements were people under the age of 30 years compared with just 12.2% of employees in the APS workforce below 30 years of age, (APSED December 2018 Table 42).

Movements between agencies and multi-agency experience

As a whole, movements between agencies are a relatively small part of the mobility picture across the APS. In 2018, a total of 4,275 ongoing employees moved to another agency within the APS via promotion or transfer at level. This equates to 3.2% of ongoing employees having moved between agencies either permanently or as a temporary transfer. Over the past 20 years this rate has been quite stable, fluctuating between 1.5% and 3.7%.

Overall, the majority of APS employees have experience working in a single agency. At 31 December 2018, 71.5% of all APS employees had worked only in one agency, 17.9% in two agencies and 10.5% in three or more agencies.

The proportion of APS employees with multi-agency experience varied based on some key demographics. For example, the overall proportion of employees who have worked in more than one agency are:

  • In relatively senior roles, including SES at 62.7% and EL at 42.4%.
  • Located in the ACT—44.8%.
  • In micro agencies of 20 staff or fewer—60.4%.
  • Working in policy agencies—50.4%.

The drivers behind these variables are related; for example, most policy agencies are located within the ACT, which affects the mobility rates behind both location and agency type. Seniority is also linked to the time people have worked in the APS, with the average length of service of SES being 18.6 years, and therefore have a greater opportunity to work across multiple agencies.

Separations

Employees separate from the APS through a number of mechanisms, including resignations, termination of employment, retrenchment, age retirement, physical or mental incapacity, death and compulsory movement to non-APS agency. In 2018, there were 12,558 separations of ongoing employees.  Unlike engagements, separations have remained relatively stable over time, generally fluctuating between 7,000 and 13,000 employees per year. (APSED December 2018 Table 57)

Resignations were the most common separation type (39.4%) in 2018. Resignations make up the highest proportion of separations each year.

Retrenchments were the second highest separation type across the APS making up 23.2%. Retrenchments continue to fall as a proportion of all separations from a peak making up 52.1% during 2014.

Trend data indicates the close relationship between numbers of resignations and retrenchments. Generally, resignations will fall as the number of retrenchments rise.

Age retirements are the third most common separation type with 19.2% in 2018. This has decreased slightly from 23.3% during 2017. (APSED December 2018 Table 57).

The number of separations also included 1movement employees from the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) in Defence, out of coverage of the PS Act.

Figure 7: Separations by type December 2000–2018

Source: APSED December 2018 Table 57

Size and Shape of the APS

Size and Shape of the APS

At 31 December 2018, there were 147,163 employees in the Australian Public Service (APS). This was a drop of 2,858 employees (1.9%) from the data snapshot of the same time last year. From 31 December 2017 to 30 June 2018, there was an increase of 397(0.3%) APS employees followed by a decline of 3,255 (2.2%) APS employees from 30 June 2018 to 31 December 2018.  

APS employee numbers have fallen by 11.7% from their December 2011 peak of 166,583.

Overall

At 31 December 2018, the APS included:

  • 132,446 ongoing employees (90%)
  • 14,717 non-ongoing employees (10%):
    • 7,430 employed for a specified term or task
    • 7,287 employed on an irregular/intermittent basis (known as ‘casual’ employees).

Fluctuations in the overall headcount occur for many reasons including seasonal patterns, business and government requirements and demand. The majority of decreases over the last calendar year were within three agencies:

The Department of Human Services had a total reduction of 1,627 (decrease of 1,354 ongoing and decrease of 273 non-ongoing).

The Department of Defence saw an overall reduction of 1,551 staff. This is a net figure that takes into account the movement by the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), out of the Public Service Act 1999 (the PS Act).
The Australian Taxation Office also had a total reduction of 442 (decrease of 896 ongoing and increase of 454 non-ongoing).
 
Figure 1: APS employee headcount December 2000 to December 2018

Source:  APSED December 2018 Table 1

At 31 December 2018, the largest four agencies in the APS accounted for 55.7% of the total APS workforce. This includes the Department of Human Services (21.5%), the Australian Taxation Office (13.1%), the Department of Defence (11.4%) and the Department of Home Affairs (9.7%), (APSED December 2018 Table 2).
During 2018, there were 517 employee movements between APS agencies due to Machinery of Government changes. The majority of these transfers were into:

  • Department of Social Services from Department of Health (283).
  • Department of Home Affairs from Attorney General’s Department (82).
  • NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission from Department of Social Services (35).
  • Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (34).

During 2018, a number of other changes occurred to the structure that had an effect on the spread of headcounts across the APS. See Appendix 2 for details of these coverage changes, along with a historical breakdown of employee numbers moving in and out of coverage under the PS Act since 2001-2002.

Ongoing

Ongoing employees make up 90% of the APS workforce. The number of ongoing employees has dropped by 3,923 since December 2017.  

While there was an overall decrease in ongoing numbers, agencies that saw an increase in ongoing employees during 2018 were the National Disability Insurance Agency (652), the Department of Social Services (205) and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (106). A new agency, NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission, was also established on 1 July 2018 with 88 ongoing employees, (APSED December 2018 Table 2).

Non-ongoing

Non-ongoing employees have increased by 1,065 over the 2018 calendar year, and in December 2018 equated to 10% of the APS. Non-ongoing employment consists of three distinct sub-groups: specific term, specific task, and irregular or intermittent (casuals). Of the non-ongoing employees, casuals represented 49.5%, while specified term employees made up 46.7% at 31 December 2018. 

The number of casuals within the total APS workforce has risen considerably since 2000 (0.5%) and peaked in 2016 (6.0%). In the last two years, the proportion of casual employees has fallen slightly, down to 5.0% at December 2018.

Figure 2: APS non-ongoing employess, December 2000–December 2018 (%)

Source:  APSED December 2018 Table 1

During 2018, agencies that reported a large increase in the number of non-ongoing APS employees were the Australian Electoral Commission (529) and the Australian Taxation Office (454).  

APS Characteristics

Age Profile

The average age of the APS workforce was 43.6 years at 31 December 2018. (APSED December 2018 Table 77).

Average age has increased steadily from 40.3 years in December 2002. This is in line with the trends in aging across the general Australian workforce, (ABS 3101.0 – Australian Demographic Statistics, June 2018).

The proportion of the APS population that is 50 years or older has increased from 20.1% in 2000 to 32.8% in 2018. Conversely, the rate of employees under the age of 30 has declined from 17.5% in 2000 to 12.2% in 2018,  
(APSED December 2018 Table 26).

Classification Structure

At 31 December 2018, the most common classification across the APS was APS 6 (22.3%). This has grown from 18.2% in 2000. The most common classification was APS 4 (24.0%) in 2000, but this has dropped to 19.6% in 2018.  APS 4 and APS 6 classifications are the most common levels at which engagements across the APS take place. (APSED December 2018 Table 11).

Figure 3: Proportion of APS employees by Classification, 30 June 2018

Source: APSED December 2018 Table 8

Geographic distribution of the APS

Figure 4: APS employees headcount and proportion by States and Territories at 31 December 2018

Source: APSED December 2018 Table 10

Of all states and territories, the largest number of APS employees was found in the ACT (55,213) although this represented only 37.5% of the APS. The three largest states by population (New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland) made up almost half (47.0%) of the APS workforce with a total of 69,173 employees.

A total of 1,376 APS employees were located overseas. Agencies that employed large proportions of overseas staff included the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (67.7%), Department of Home Affairs (14.6%), Department of Defence (9.5%) and the Australian Trade and Investment Commission (5.2%), (APSED December 2018 Table 15).

Regional distribution of APS

Almost one in seven,13.9% or 20,467, employees of the APS workforce was located in regional areas (outside capital cities) at 31 December 2018. This has steadily increased since December 2011 (12.1%). The growth in employee numbers outside of capital cities has occurred in Victoria and the Northern Territory (APSED December 2018 Table 13).

In regional areas, NSW had the highest proportion of employees at 41.8%, followed by Queensland (25%) and Victoria (21.4%). The proportion of the APS working in the capital cities (other than Canberra) has shown a decline from 52.8% in 2003 to 47.6% in 2018. The proportion of employees based in the ACT increased from 33.4% in 2003 to 39.7% in 2012 before falling to 37.5% in 2018, (APSED December 2018 Table 13).

Appendicies: Online table index

Appendicies: Online table index

The tables listed below represent the data available from the Australian Public Service Employment Database (APSED).

List of Tables

Table 1: All employees: gender by employment category, 31 December 2000 to 31 December 2018
Table 2: All employees: agency by employment category, 31 December 2017, 30 June 2018 and 31 December 2018
Table 3: Ongoing employees: agency by employment status, gender and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 4: Non-ongoing employees: agency by employment status, gender and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 5: All employees: agency by employment status, gender and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 6: Ongoing employees: agency by base classification and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 7: Non-ongoing employees: agency by base classification and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 8: All employees: agency by base classification and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 9: All employees: agency by gender and classification level, 31 December 2018
Table 10: All employees: location by base classification and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 11: All employees: base classification by gender, 31 December 2000 to 31 December 2018
Table 12: All employees: location (statistical area four) by year, 31 December 2003 to 31 December 2018
Table 13: All employees: location by year, 31 December 2003 to 31 December 2018
Table 14: All employees: paid classification by gender, 31 December 2009 to 31 December 2018
Table 15: All employees: agency by location, 31 December 2018
Table 16: All employees: agency by age group, 31 December 2018
Table 17: All employees: location by base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 18: All employees: employment status by base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 19: All employees, employment status by base classification and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 20: All employees: agency by base classification group, 31 December 2017 and 2018
Table 21: All employees: agency by median length of service (years) and base classification, 31 December 2018
Table 22: All employees: age group by base classification and employment category, 31 December 2018
Table 23: Ongoing employees: age group by base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 24: Non-ongoing employees: age group by base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 25: All employees: age group by base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 26: All employees: age group by gender, 31 December 2000 to 31 December 2018
Table 27: All employees: highest educational qualification by base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 28: All employees: job family by gender, 31 December 2018
Table 29: All employees: job family by classification level, 31 December 2018
Table 30: Agency type and size data, 31 December 2018
Table 31: Agency metrics, 31 December 2018
Table 32: Ongoing employees: agency by paid classification, 31 December 2018
Table 33: Non-ongoing employees: agency by non-ongoing category and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 34: Ongoing employees: length of service by gender, 31 December 2000 to 31 December 2018
Table 35: Ongoing employees: agency retention, 31 December 2017 to 31 December 2018
Table 36: Ongoing employees: agency by temporary assignment classification, 31 December 2018
Table 37: All employees: agency by highest educational qualification, 31 December 2018
Table 38: Ongoing employees: agency by number of agencies worked in and base classification group, 31 December 2018
Table 39: Ongoing employees: base classification by paid classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 40: All employees: mean age (years) by location, base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 41: All employees: median length of service (years) by location, base classification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 42: Engagements of ongoing employees: age group by gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 43: Engagements of ongoing employees: classification by gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 44: Engagements of ongoing employees: agency by major classification group, 2017 and 2018
Table 45: Engagements of ongoing employees: age group by classification and gender, 2018
Table 46: Engagements of ongoing employees: prior service in APS by classification and gender, 2018
Table 47: Engagements of ongoing employees: highest educational qualification by classification and gender, 2018
Table 48: Engagements of ongoing employees: previous employment by classification and gender, 2018
Table 49: Engagements of ongoing employees: location by classification and gender, 2018
Table 50: Engagements of ongoing employees: mean age (years) by location, classification and gender, 2018
Table 51: Promotions of ongoing employees: classification promoted from and to by gender, 2018
Table 52: Promotions of ongoing employees: mean age (years) by location, classification and gender, 2018
Table 53: Promotions of ongoing employees: agency by classification, 2018
Table 54: Promotions of ongoing employees: within, from and to other agencies, 2018
Table 55: Transfers of ongoing employees: from and to other agencies, 2018
Table 56: Movement of ongoing employees: location from and to by gender, 2018
Table 57: Separations of ongoing employees: type of separation by gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 58: Separations of ongoing employees: base classification by gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 59: Separations of ongoing employees: age group by gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 60: Separations of ongoing employees: resignations by age group and gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 61: Separations of ongoing employees: age retirements by age group and gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 62: Separations of ongoing employees: retrenchments by age group and gender, 2000 to 2018
Table 63: Separations of ongoing employees: separation type by base classification and gender, 2018
Table 64: Separations of ongoing employees: agency by type of separation, 2017 and 2018
Table 65: Separations of ongoing employees: agency by type of termination, 2018
Table 66: Separations of ongoing employees: agency by base classification, 2018
Table 67: Separations of ongoing employees: length of service by base classification and gender, 2018
Table 68: Separations of ongoing employees: length of service by type of separation and gender, 2018
Table 69: All employees: diversity group, 2004 to 2018
Table 70: Ongoing employees: agency by diversity group, 31 December 2018
Table 71: Non-ongoing employees: agency by diversity group, 31 December 2018
Table 72: All employees: agency by diversity group, 31 December 2018
Table 73: All employees: base classification by diversity group and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 74: All employees: diversity group by highest educational qualification and gender, 31 December 2018
Table 75: Engagements of ongoing employees: classification by diversity group and gender, 2018
Table 76: Separations of ongoing employees: base classification by diversity group and gender, 2018
Table 77: Average age by year, 2000 to 2018

Appendicies: Machinery of Government changes

Appendicies: Machinery of Government changes

Table A1: Movement between APS agencies during 2018

Date

Agency employees moved from

Agency employees moved to

Number of ongoing staff

Number of non-ongoing staff

25/01/2018

Human Services

Australian Digital Health Agency

9

.

8/02/2018

Attorney-General's

Home Affairs

51

2

8/02/2018

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Jobs and Small Business

4

.

8/02/2018

Treasury

Jobs and Small Business

21

3

22/02/2018

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities

34

.

22/02/2018

Agriculture and Water Resources

Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities

8

.

8/03/2018

Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities

Home Affairs

16

.

22/03/2018

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Industry, Innovation and Science

3

.

5/04/2018

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Office of National Intelligence

9

.

5/04/2018

Treasury

Jobs and Small Business

3

.

17/05/2018

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Attorney-General's

2

.

31/05/2018

Attorney-General's

Home Affairs

29

.

1/07/2018

Social Services

NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission

34

1

1/07/2018

Human Services

Australian Taxation Office

1

.

1/07/2018

Education and Training

Prime Minister and Cabinet

3

.

1/07/2018

Education and Training

Social Services

1

.

3/09/2018

Health

Social Services

235

30

4/10/2018

Health

Social Services

16

.

18/10/2018

Health

Social Services

2

.

Table A2: Movements from non-APS agencies during 2018
Date Agency Ongoing
15/01/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 1
29/01/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 2
12/02/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 2
26/02/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 1
5/03/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 3
1/05/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 1
1/07/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 1
2/07/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 22
29/11/2018 National Disability Insurance Agency 157
Table A3: Changed APS numbers resulting from MoG changes 2002 to 2018

 

 

Additions

Reductions

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

Total

2000

7

.

7

1

.

1

2001

.

.

.

1

.

1

2002

5

.

5

.

.

.

2003

263

2

265

1

.

1

2004

121

5

126

1309

100

1409

2005

5046

250

5296

52

1

53

2006

527

40

567

3

1

4

2007

150

424

574

.

.

.

2008

360

65

425

.

466

466

2009

20

.

20

.

.

.

2010

158

36

194

.

.

.

2011

210

35

245

4

.

4

2012

64

2

66

.

.

.

2013

7

.

7

2

.

2

2014

262

2

264

.

.

.

2015

631

49

680

299

87

386

2016

164

1

165

.

.

.

2017

84

.

84

.

.

.

2018

190

.

190

1809

24

1833

Total

8269

911

9180

3481

679

4160