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Appendix 4 Supporting Statistics

This appendix presents additional data that supports the content included in the main chapters of this report.

Machinery of Government changes

Machinery of Government (MoG) changes involve the movement of functions, resources and people from one agency to another and are executed by Government decisions; predominantly through Administrative Arrangement Orders (AAOs), the engagement of employees under the Public Service Act 1999 or the compulsory movement of employees outside of the APS.

In total, there were 20 MoGs executed over the 2019-20 financial year, including the decisions to reduce the number of departments from 18 to 14.[1] The most significant changes were:

  • Employment and skills functions (2,190 employees) transferring to the renamed Department of Education, Skills and Employment (previously the Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business).
  • Agriculture functions (5,084 employees) transferring to the renamed Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (previously the Department of Agriculture).
  • Communications and arts functions (568 employees) transferring to the renamed Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications (previously the Department of Communications and the Arts). 
  • The Department known as Services Australia was abolished and established as a new Executive Agency within the Social Services Portfolio.
Table A4.1: Machinery of Government changes (2019-20)

Date

AAO

1 July 2019

The National Indigenous Australians Agency was established and 1,105 employees were moved from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to the National Indigenous Australians Agency.

The Department of Social Services moved 92 employees to the Department of Home Affairs.

The Department of Education moved 17 employees to the Department of Home Affairs.

1,973 employees from the Australian Securities and Investments Commission left coverage of the Public Service Act 1999.

8 July 2019

The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet moved a further 2 employees to the National Indigenous Australians Agency.

25 July 2019

The Department of Education moved 472 employees to the Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business.

The Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business moved 362 employees to the Attorney-General's Department.

1 August 2019

The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet moved 92 employees to the National Indigenous Australians Agency.

17 October 2019

One employee was moved under the employment coverage of the Public Service Act 1999 in the National Disability Insurance Agency.

11 November 2019

Six employees were moved under the employment coverage of the Public Service Act 1999 in the National Disability Insurance Agency.

25 November 2019

Three employees were moved under the employment coverage of the Public Service Act 1999 in the National Disability Insurance Agency.

1 January 2020

The Department of Health moved 67 employees to the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission, which established on that day.

20 January 2020

Three employees were moved under the employment coverage of the Public Service Act 1999 in the National Disability Insurance Agency.

23 January 2020

The Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business moved 3 employees to the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business moved 86 employees to the Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources.

The Department of Environment and Energy moved 522 employees following the transfer of energy functions to the Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources.

1 February 2020

The Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business moved 2,190 employees following the transfer of the employment and skills functions to the Department of Education, Skills and Employment.

The Department of Agriculture moved 5,084 employees following the transfer of agriculture functions to the renamed Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment.

The Department of Communications and the Arts moved 568 employees following the transfer of communications and arts functions to the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications.

The Department known as Services Australia (formerly known as the Department of Human Services) was abolished. Services Australia was established as an Executive Agency within the Social Services Portfolio.

6 February 2020

Services Australia moved 47 employees to the Department of Social Services.

The Department of Social Services moved 206 employees to Services Australia.

14 April 2020

One employee was moved under the employment coverage of the Public Service Act 1999, in the National Disability Insurance Agency.

11 May 2020

One employee was moved under the employment coverage of the Public Service Act 1999, in the National Disability Insurance Agency.

14 May 2020

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet moved 36 employees to the National Drought and North Queensland Flood Response and Recovery Agency (previously North Queensland Livestock Industry Recovery Agency).

Code of Conduct

Breaches of the APS Code of Conduct

Table A4.2 presents the number of APS employees investigated by agencies for suspected breaches of individual elements of the APS Code of Conduct and the number of breach findings in 2019–20. One employee can be investigated for multiple elements of the Code of Conduct of the Public Service Act 1999.

Table A4.2: Number of APS employees investigated and found in breach of elements of the APS Code of Conduct (2019-20)

Element of Code of Conduct

Investigated

Breached

Behave honestly and with integrity in connection with APS employment (s. 13(1))

325

269

Act with care and diligence in connection with APS employment (s. 13(2))

206

167

When acting in connection with APS employment, treat everyone with respect and courtesy, and without harassment (s. 13(3))

139

104

When acting in connection with APS employment comply with all applicable Australian laws (s. 13(4))

34

16

Comply with any lawful and reasonable direction given by someone in the employee's Agency who has authority to give the direction (s. 13(5))

195

142

Maintain appropriate confidentiality about dealings that the employee has with any Minister or Minister's member of staff (s. 13(6))

1

0

Take reasonable steps to avoid any conflict of interest (real or apparent), and disclose details of any material personal interest of the employee, in connection with the employee’s APS employment (s. 13(7))

87

69

Use Commonwealth resources in a proper manner and for a proper purpose (s. 13(8))

138

104

Not provide false or misleading information in response to a request for information that is made for official purposes in connection with the employee's APS employment (s. 13(9))

66

51

Not make improper use of: inside information, or the employee's duties, status, power or authority, in order to: a) gain, or seek to gain, a benefit or advantage for the employee or any other person; or b) cause, or seek to cause, a detriment to the employee's Agency, the Commonwealth or any other person (s. 13(10))

63

43

At all times behave in a way that upholds the APS Values and APS Employment Principles, and the integrity and good reputation of the employee's Agency and the APS (s. 13(11))

495

434

While on duty overseas, at all times behave in a way that upholds the good reputation of Australia (s. 13(12))

3

2

Comply with any other conduct requirement that is prescribed by the regulations (s. 13(13))

1

1

Source: 2020 APS agency survey

Sources of reports

Table A4.3 presents the number of APS employees investigated for suspected breaches of the APS Code of Conduct during 2019–20 that resulted from each type of report.

Table A4.3: Type of reports leading to finalised APS Code of Conduct investigations (2019-20)

Type of report

Number of employees

A report generated by a compliance/monitoring system (e.g. audit)

264

A report made to a central conduct or ethics unit or nominated person in a human resources area

263

A report made to an email reporting address

53

A report made to a fraud prevention and control unit or hotline

36

A Public Interest Disclosure

16

A report made to an employee advice or counselling unit

7

A report made to another hotline

2

Other

19

Source: 2020 APS agency survey

Outcomes of reports

Table A4.4 presents the outcomes for APS employees investigated for suspected breaches of the APS Code of Conduct during 2019–20.

Table A4.4: Outcome of investigations into suspected breaches of the APS Code of Conduct (2019-20)

Outcome

Number of employees

Breach found and sanction applied

390

Breach found but no sanction applied: employee resigned prior to sanction decision

90

No breach found (for any element of the Code)

90

Breach found but no sanction applied: other reason

50

Investigation discontinued: employee resigned

20

Investigation discontinued: other reason

17

Source: 2020 APS agency survey

Table A4.5 presents the sanctions applied to APS employees found to have breached the APS Code of Conduct during 2019–20.

Table A4.5: Sanctions imposed for breaches of the APS Code of Conduct (2019-20)

Sanction

Number of employees

Reprimand

259

Reduction in salary

109

Deduction from salary by way of a fine

88

Termination of employment

87

Reduction in classification

26

Re-assignment of duties

15

Source: 2020 APS agency survey

Location

Figure A4.6 presents the dispersion of job families across Canberra, other cities and regions across Australia.

Figure A4.6: Job families, by location (30 June 2020)

Figure A4.6 shows job families by location. The job family with the highest proportion in the ACT is strategic policy, where just under 90% of employees work in the ACT

Source: APSED

Harassment and bullying

Table A4.7 presents the number of recorded complaints of harassment and bullying made by APS employees within APS agencies during 2019-20.

Table A4.7: Complaints to agencies about harassment and bullying (2019-20)

Type of harassment or bullying

Number of complaints

Verbal abuse (e.g. offensive language, derogatory remarks, shouting or screaming)

132

Inappropriate and unfair application of work policies or rules (e.g. performance management, access to leave, access to learning and development)

90

Interference with work tasks (e.g. withholding needed information, undermining or sabotage)

53

Sexual harassment

32

Physical behaviour

19

Cyberbullying (e.g. harassment via IT, or the spreading of gossip/materials intended to defame/humiliate)

19

Interference with personal property or work equipment

3

Initiations or pranks

1

Other

56

Total number of complaints about bullying/harassment

531

Source: 2020 APS agency survey

[1] The Hon Scott Morrison MP. (2019). New Structure of Government Departments. 5 December.